Tufts University

By | March 20, 2015

Scientific research has proven that climate change may increase the perception of pain but not the evolution of disease, probably due to changes in atmospheric pressure produced by the climate changes that could cause changes in the pressure of the affected joint. Moisture and cold increases stiffness and pain in many patients. These annoyances improve a dry and temperate climate. In any way patients must adapt to the climate of the place where they live, to take measures to protect themselves from the cold and humidity. There are study revealing that people suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, the drop in the thermometer Yes exerts an effect on pain articulate.

Approximately in 40 per cent of sufferers are susceptible to predict meteorological phenomena with their pain. The popular comment is going to rain, because it hurts the knee already it has scientific basis. A study conducted in the metropolitan area of Barcelona confirms that the atmospheric pressure and temperature variations they affect people with osteoarthritis and arthritis. Yet the causes of this interaction are not known, but minimum has confirmed that it exists and is not an invention of whiners sick. Changes in temperature or barometric pressure (a measurement that refers to the weight of the circulating air) triggers or exacerbates the pain in the joints, although researchers still aren’t completely sure why. In 2007, scientists at Tufts University in Boston, noted that every 10 degrees of temperature drop corresponded to the gradual increase in the pain of arthritis. Increased barometric pressure was also a trigger for pain in the Tufts study. The influence of the climatic changes in climatic conditions arthritis are not a cause of arthritis, but they can influence how the patient feels.

The climate does not to disease improve or worsen. Some climatic factors capable of increasing pain or stiffness are: cold weather, moisture from rain or snow, a decrease of the barometric pressure and humidity increased just before a storm. Some people experience an improvement in symptoms of arthritis in hot, dry areas. Talk to your doctor before moving to a different climate zone, and try to make short visits to the place in the different seasons of the year to see how it feels.


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