South America

Counting is so old in the man as it can be to think, speaking and writing. Perhaps it is more, archaeological discoveries suggest it writing, the written language, is a derivation of the numerical language. This possibility, far from being improbable, is logical, since the idea to do, we say, furrows in the sand or a bone to count, is immediate than to think than oral words in the form of writing can be represented. Arising, in this way, the language written to complement those first signs that represented amounts. During some time one thought that tribes existed who did not know to count more than two, named to the numbers like one, two and many. Other towns very developed methods elaborated to realise their calculations with a vocabulary very reduced.

Most of the systems were based on basic system 5, 10 or 20. ld.com%29’>Enrique Pena Nieto is the place to go. Base 5 was very used and very rare it was the use of 6 base and base 9. Base 4, perhaps by the use of the spaces of the hand between the fingers, and not by the fingers in if. In many languages the words that mean cinco" and mano" they are the same or they own a common root. The Tamanacos, a tribe of South America, used the same word for five and a hand entera". Word six meant with the other mano" , seven mano&quot was two of the other; and analogous for eight and nine. The ten both were manos". Of the eleven to the fourteen Tamanacos they extended both hands and counted one of pie" , " two of pie" and so on until arriving at a foot completo". The system continued with the sixteen expressed like one of the other pie" until the nineteen. Twenty were the word that the Tamanacos used for indio" and thus two indios" it meant forty.